Histories of Persons Interred at Prospect Hill Cemetery  |  Prospect Hill 1810 to Present & Stories of Nantucket

Historical Information About Persons Interred At Prospect Hill Cemetery

The histories of persons interred at Prospect Hill Cemetery are valuable resources for family members, historians, genealogists and others with an interest in Nantucket history.

As you read further, discover the descriptions of whaling captains, read about those who were lost at sea, learn about island merchants, artists, a congressman, Civil War prisoners and veterans, an astronomer, a school principal, a Nobel Prize recipient, diverse groups of people and their families who called Nantucket home. Many people are the subjects of portraits, some by noted artists such as William Swain and James S. Hathaway, which are part of the Nantucket Historical Association (NHA) collection. A number of persons have photographs included in the NHA’s Research Library’s Historic Images Collection.

Take a moment to peruse the past through those who are interred at historic Prospect Hill Cemetery.


Please visit our “Prospect Hill 1810 to Present & Stories of Nantucket " page to read about the storied residents at Prospect Hill from excerpts selected from the Prospect Hill Cemetery Association's book:
Tuck't In: A Walking Tour of Historic Prospect Hill Cemetery Nantucket, MA. Scroll down to the bottom of that page and click on the highlighted links. Remember to check back for excerpt updates.


                                                                  (This page is under construction)
                                                                           by Paula Lundy Levy
                                     Prospect Hill Cemetery Webmaster, Cemetery Historian, Data Coordinator



                                            Histories of Persons Interred at Prospect Hill Cemetery Nantucket, MA


Lot X South Side. Lydia Williams Jenks. d. June 25, 1814.
                           Eliza Williams Jenks. d. August 20, 1822.
Lydia Williams Jenks was the daughter of James Williams and the first wife of Boston native Samuel Haynes Jenks. Samuel and Lydia had a daughter Lydia Maria born May 5, 1814. Lydia Williams Jenks died in Boston, MA at the age of eighteen from typhus fever. She was interred at Boston's second oldest cemetery, Copp's Hill Burying Ground, on June 27, 1814. Mr. Monroe was the undertaker.

Eliza Williams Jenks was the daughter of James Williams and the third wife of Boston native Samuel Haynes Jenks' four wives. Samuel and Eliza were married on September 23, 1818 and they had two children: William (b. 1819) and Eliza (b. 1822). Eliza Williams Jenks died on Nantucket and shares a memorial with her sister Lydia Williams Jenks who is interred at Boston. The marker is located in the South Side section of Prospect Hill Cemetery. This lot does not have a lot number.


Lot X South Side. Lydia A. Jenks. b.. 1799 - d. May 17, 1817
                          Maria Louisa Jenks. b. February 16, 1817 - d. July 13, 1817

Lydia A. Jenks was the daughter of Dennis and Phebe Arthur Stevens and the second wife of Samuel H. Jenks. The couple were married in Boston by Rev. James Winchell on January 28, 1816. Their daughter Maria Louisa Jenks was born on February 16, 1817 and passed away on July 18, 1817. This lot does not have a lot number.




Lot 5 South Side.  Josiah A. Young. February 2, 1848 – August 27, 1918.
Josiah was the son of fisherman William Young and Elizabeth Backus Young (Styles). He was the third husband of Susan J. Gardner Francis McGarvey, widow of William R. Francis and Alexander McGarvey, marrying on July 19, 1884. The couple did not have children of their own; however, Susan had two sons from her marriage to Alexander McGarvey Sr., Alexander Jr. and Andrew.


Josiah was fourteen-years old when he enlisted in the U.S. Navy during the Civil War. He served from November 18, 1862, until August 1865 on board ships National Guard, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. After the war, Josiah resided on Pine Street. He was a member of Grand Army of The Republic (GAR), Thomas M. Gardner Post. Josiah recorded his occupations as day laborer and “odd jobs” in the 1900 and 1920 U.S. Federal Censuses. You may view Josiah in “Gathering of Civil War Veterans” in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number P1574.


 


Lot 5 Charles Albert Selden. October 10, 1870 – February 9, 1949.
Born on Nantucket, Charles was the older of two children born to Charles Selden Sr. and Lydia Hodges Selden. Charles was a twenty-five-year-old journalist when he married twenty-five-year-old teacher Grace Savage in Medford, Massachusetts, on October 13, 1895. He was the grandson of Captain Sylvester Hodges. In Nantucket Doorways: Thresholds to the Past, Edouard A. Stackpole and Melvin B. Summerfield write that Charles was inspired by his grandfather:

“When I thought of him [Captain Hodges] sailing a seventy-foot brig from Nantucket to the Antarctic Ocean, hunting for seals in the South Shetland Islands with no charts to help him, I never considered any of the tasks which first appeared insurmountable as being impossible.”

Charles graduated from Brown University in 1893 and apprenticed with the Providence Journal. He next worked at the New York Sun and, in 1904, became a correspondent at the New York Evening Post. There, in 1913, he became assistant editor and then editor of the paper. Three years later, Charles became a traveling correspondent for the NewYork Times, and, in 1918, he became the correspondent for the New York Times in Paris and London. Charles also wrote articles for the Ladies Home Journal. He covered events from the sinking of the Titanic to the Versailles Treaty at the end of World War I to the Lorano Treaty, a prelude to World War II. Charles interviewed Mohandas K. Gandhi and reported on the abdication of Edward VIII to marry Bessie Wallis Warfield Spencer Simpson. In 1936, Charles retired to Nantucket to live in his boyhood home on Liberty Street. A February 11, 1949, editorial in the New York Times remembers Charles as a legendary journalist:


[He] was a newspaper man’s ideal of a newspaper man. Whether the matter in hand was the signing of a peace treaty to end a war, the abdication of a king in romantic circumstances, or a mere local happening in our city, he attacked the story with equal zest and gave to it a human quality which was his own, and a distinction which was the envy and admiration of his fellow-craftsmen. His spontaneous curiosity was so disarming that the most reticent became communicative under its spell.


The Times takes note of their colleagues’ affection for Charles:


. . . His whimsical stories about this town for the Sun and the old Evening Post are legends in NewYork’s newspaper offices, and it was said of him that he never went out on a story that he did not bring back a good one – even if the story he went out on did not pan out, and his point of observation as at the auction of a famous actress’s treasures – was a seat on the curbstone outside.

As a man and a fellow-workman he was the salt of the earth – with that extra tang of the island of his birth – and his old comrades on all the newspapers he served so well remember him with warm affection.


Charles died on Nantucket at Nantucket Cottage Hospital at the age of seventy-eight.
 



Lot 8 B South Side. Captain Allen Fuller. October 3, 1786 – June 22, 1850.
Captain Allen Fuller was born in Barnstable, Massachusetts, the son of Zaccheus and Martha Fuller. His first wife was Betsey Smith of Barnstable, Massachusetts.  Captain Fuller had two daughters from his first marriage  Nancy (b. 1816) and Catharine (b. 1817). He and his second wife Phebe Ellis, had four children. In the 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Captain Fuller recorded his occupation as trader. The Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910 listed Captain Fuller as a merchant. Captain Allen Fuller died of consumption at the age of sixty-two years. Allen Fuller's death was recorded as June 24, 1850, in the Massachusetts Vital Records 1841-1910; however, engraved on his marker is June 22, 1850.


Lot 8 B South Side. Phebe Fuller. 1798 – December 12, 1860.
Phebe was born in Sandwich, Massachusetts, the daughter of Benjamin and Susan Ellis. She was Captain Allen Fuller's second wife, and they had four children: Paulina (b. 1820), Phebe (b. 1823), Allen (b. 1829), and Josephena Maria, who died suddenly from "violent fever" at three years and four months. Their son Allen married and separated from Captain Nathaniel Fitzgerald's daughter Hannah.

The widow Phebe lived on the north side of Silver Street, where she had a store in the front section of her home. On the night of November 22, 1860, a neighbor passed the house and noticed that the door was open. It was nine o’clock in the evening.
The neighbor, concerned that the elderly Phebe was ill entered and found the shop empty. She walked into the living room where she found Phebe Fuller on the ground in a pool of blood. She had been severely beaten her scalp was torn from her head in several places. Her right ear was split, her nose was fractured and her right arm and hand were severely bruised. Next to her body was a bloodied whalebone fid,the instrument used in the assault. Fids were used to separate the strands in rope on whaleships. This fid could have already been in Phebe’s home. After all her late husband was a captain. The money drawer in the shop was open with money in it;
but there was no way to ascertain if any monies had been taken.

The neighbor called for help. Captain Nathaniel Fitzgerald (See Lot 139) answered the call and carried Phebe to her couch. Dr. John H. Sherman was summoned. Phebe was alive but unconscious having suffered a severe head injury. She would slip in and out of consciousness for the next two weeks. On November 25, she said, “I cannot live. Let no one follow me to the grave; I am principled against it.” When asked who did this she said Patience Cooper. As she slipped in and out of consciousness, she would give different accounts of the incident. In one account when asked who did this, she named Patience Cooper. In another, she said a white man whom she had never seen before had committed the crime. In yet another version, she gave a detailed description of what Patience Cooper did to her.

Phebe died from her injuries on December 12. Patience Cooper, characterized by Nantucket historian Edouard Stackpole as a mulatto woman, was arrested for the murder of Phebe Fuller. At Patience Cooper's first trial for the murder of Phebe Fuller a witness who stated Phebe Fuller had often mistaken people for other people was not brought into evidence. The jury returned with a guilty verdict. This verdict was appealed, and in 1862, a new trial was ordered. At her second trial, Patience Cooper was found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to ten years in the House of Corrections.

Patience began to serve her sentence at the Old Jail. She was able to take in sewing and washing, the jailer would set aside her earnings for her future use.Throughout the two trials, Patience Cooper maintained her innocence. A number of summer visitors took an interest in Patience Cooper among them a Mr. Salom would often speak to her about the crime; he was able to get her to speak about it where others could not. He convinced her to speak with the authorities about the crime. Patience did and swore on a bible that she had no knowledge of the murder. Mr. Salom said one of the criteria before her sentence could be commuted was a full and free confession of guilt. It was on a Sunday in May that Patience made her confession dictated to Mr. Salom. In it, she said she was guilty of causing the death of Mrs. Fuller. She went to see Mrs. Fuller about her bill. They had an argument provoked by Mrs. Fuller using bad language at her. Patience said she struck her in the head several times.When she left the shop Mrs. Fuller was leaning against the counter. When asked what she did next she replied she went directly home through Silver Street and up Pleasant Street. When asked if she washed the blood off Patience replied that there wasn’t any blood on her hands or clothes. She then added that her confession was to ease her mind and that she was sorry for having caused her death. When asked if she had an accomplice she replied no. Patience Cooper served her ten-year sentence and then spent the last years of her life at the asylum where she died on October 29, 1885 at the age of seventy-five.

Island sentiment was mixed about Patience's confession. Many believed she confessed in order to secure the commutation of her sentence. Others believed she was shielding the guilty party, while others believed in her guilt.  Who murdered Phebe Fuller? The story remains a true Nantucket murder mystery.

 


Lot 8 Lewis H. Wendel (Wendell) (Wendall). d. December 16, 1878.
Lewis was a genuine Nantucket washashore! He was born in Stettin, Prussia. Lewis was a crew member on the brig Florida that wrecked off Sankaty in 1833. After his rescue, he made Nantucket his home. Lewis married Eunice N. Rogers on October 14, 1834. His occupation was cartman or truckman. Among his customers were the Gas Works Company and the Straw Works, and for forty years, his "Prussian blue cart" delivered the mail from the boat to the post office. He organized a benevolent society comprised of sixteen ladies to render aid to the needy.

In The Island of Nantucket: What It Was and What It Is, Edward K. Godfrey writes of Lewis "For nearly half a century [Lewis] lived upon the island, highly respected and esteemed by all classes."


Lot 10  Hon. David Joy. October 18, 1808 - April 5, 1875.
Hon. David Joy was the son of Moses Joy and Deborah Macy Joy. He was the first husband of Charlotte Austin.
A prominent whaling merchant and owner of a candle -making factory. He co-founded the Nantucket Athenaeum
in 1833. David and fellow member Charles G. Coffin of the United Library Association offered to buy land and build
a 'substantial building' for the Association to use. He was elected as Nantucket's Representative to
the General Court in 1834 and 1837;Member of the Governor's Council in 1838; He was an abolitionist.
In 1870 David and Charlotte moved to Ventnor, Isle of Wright where he died five years later.
 


Lot 10  Charlotte Joy Mann. December 30, 1817 - March 13, 1892.
Charlotte was the daughter of Isaac Austin and Anna Easton Austin. Charlotte's first husband was David Joy. She married Seth H. Mann in 1880, her second husband. Charlotte along with her first husband, the Honorable David Joy, were active in the anti-slavery and temperance movements. Following David's death, Frederick Douglass wrote a letter of condolence to Charlotte:

...happiness to see much of our departed friend. The reports of his noble life and of his benevolent works have reached me from many quarters. Permit me then, in the name of my long enslaved and now emancipated people, Whose cause he made his own -- remembering those who were in bonds as bound with them and in my own name, to bring one laurel to the tomb of this true man and noble benefactor.
                                                                            Frederick Douglass

Charlotte Austin Joy Mann is also memorialized on her family's monument in the Isaac Austin lot 435.


Lot 11 Mount Vernon  Clinton "Mitchy" Mitchell Ray. September 10, 1870 - February 13, 1956.
Mitchy was the son of Charles F. Ray and Deborah Chadwick Ray. He was a renowned lightship basket maker. Mitchy's father, Charles F. Ray, and grandfather, Captain Charles B. Ray (lot 253) had also been basket makers. In his shop on Starubuck's Court, Mitchy crafted his baskets through the 1940's, using some molds that had belonged to his grandfather. After World War II, Mitchy taught the craft to Jose Formosa Reyes (lot 1173). Mitchy's lightship baskets had a verse affixed to the base which read:
                 
                "I was made in Nantucket. I'm strong and I'm stout. Don't lose me or burn me, and I'll never wear out."       

 


Lot 12 South Side. William Coffin, II. December 16, 1756 – May 1, 1835.
William was the only child of William Coffin and Jedidah Folger Coffin.
He married Deborah Pinkham on December 30, 1781 and they had nine children together.
Their daughter Harriett was the wife of educator Cyrus Pierce (See Lot 148), daughters Betsey (See Lot 22 South Side)
and Winnifred (See Lot 17 South Side) were the first and second wives of sheriff Elishai Starbuck,
daughter Lucy was the second wife of Captain Paul West and daughter Martha was the fourth wife
of Samuel Haynes Jenks, editor of the Nantucket Inquirer and public school advocate.

William and Deborah resided at 18 Union Street. The house built in 1808, was first located at the head of Main Street until 1817, when it was moved to its present location. William was a merchant, barber, wigmaker and Nantucket’s
first United States Postmaster. President George Washington appointed William to the office on
March 20, 1793. William had been wrongly implicated in the Nantucket Bank Robbery of June 20, 1795.
He was one of the non-Quaker bank directors. Admiral Sir Isaac Coffin named William the first president of the Coffin School.
Historian Emil F. Guba, in his book The Great Nantucket Bank Robbery Conspiracy and Solemn Aftermath, wrote of William:

"He was a prominent humanitarian figure on the island and in the opinion of this author one of its most notable inhabitants in the long history of Nantucket."


Lot 12 South Side. Deborah Coffin. February 28, 1761 – September 19, 1837.
Deborah was the fifth of seven children born to Jonathan Pinkham and Jemima Swain Pinkham. Deborah was twenty years old when she married William Coffin, II on December 30, 1781. They had nine children together.


Lot 14  Eliza Ann Morselander. February 19, 1807 - December 31, 1871.
Eliza was the daughter of David Ewer and Mary (Polly) Pease Ewer. Eliza married Captain Barzillai Morselander, and they had two daughters, Ann Eliza (b. 1831) and Mary (b. 1838). Eliza Ann was widowed at the age of thirty-two. At the time of her husband's death, Captain Morselander was master of the ship Charles, which had sailed out of New Bedford on November 30, 1837. He was thirty-five when he died in Paita, Peru, on September 2, 1839.. You may view her photographic portrait circa 1850's in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number C136.


Lot 16  Daniel B. Chase. 1822 - February 12, 1900.
Daniel was the second child and only son of Arnold Chase and Pamela Butler Chase.
His first wife was Mercy Bearse. They had seven children together. Pamela b. 1844, Andrew b. 1846, Sidney b. 1848, Daniel b. 1850, William b. 1852 and the twins Fletcher and Caroline b. 1860. Mercy passed away in 1875. Daniel married his second wife Margaret Montgomery on August 26, 1877. On May 28, 1878, Margaret died from cancer at the age of forty-eight. On April 24, 1879, Daniel wed his third wife Mary W. Allen Walker of Fairhaven, she was eighteen years his junior and once widowed.
 
During the Civil War, Daniel enlisted on August 12, 1862 in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
He joined his regiment at Alexandria, VA on August 29, 1862. Daniel was first wounded at the battle of Fredericksburg on December 11, 1862. He was shot in his leg and hand. He was wounded again at the battle of Gettysburg while defending against Pickett's Charge. On January 30, 1864, he was transferred to the 134th Company, 2nd Battalion Veteran Reserve Corps at Cliffburne Barracks, Washington, D.C. Discharged on November 10, 1864. He then returned home to Nantucket where he worked as a mason.
 


Lot 21  Harry B. Turner. February 9, 1877 - November 9, 1948.
Harry was the son of Abner Turner and Susan E. Ray Turner. Harry was twenty-one years old when he wed Gertrude C. Holmes February 27, 1898. His second wife was Grace Gordon. At the age of sixteen, while still in school, Harry began working at The Inquirer and Mirror for Roland B. Hussey for $1.00 a week. He started as an apprentice at what was called "learning the case" (typesetting done by hand). Harry worked at various mainland newspapers, returning home in 1896 to continue his work at The Inquirer and Mirror.  He was editor at the The Inquirer and Mirror from 1907 until his death in 1948. Harry was co-publisher with Arthur H. Cook.(See Lot 353). You may view a photograph of Harry, B. Turner, Roland B. Hussey and Arthur H. Cook in front of the The Inquirer and Mirror office sign in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. 
 


Lot 23 South Side Frances "Fanny" Hall. December 31, 1790 - May 19, 1812.
Frances "Fanny" was the daughter of William Coffin (lot 12 South Side) and Deborah Pinkham Coffin (lot 12 South Side). She was the wife of Fitch Hall, Jr., a merchant of Boston who lived in Medford, MA. The couple married on October 11, 1808. Fitch Hall, Jr. passed away at the age of twenty-four or twenty-five from fever on March 30, 1809. He was buried in Medford, MA on April 11, 1809. Frances "Fanny" Hall's slate marker is engraved with the word "relict", a seventeenth and eighteenth century term used to refer to a widow.

Inscribed on Frances "Fanny" Hall's marker:     [Willow and Urn engraved top center]

                                                                                   In memory of 
                                                                                 Mrs. FRANCES
                                                                                      Relict of
                                                                              Mr. FITCH HALL Jr.
                                                                            Who died May 19 1812
                                                                                   aged 21 years

To view an image of the marker please visit the "Photo Gallery" page of our website.


Lot 24A South Side.  Captain Nathan Manter.  1819 - February 6, 1897.
Nathan was the son of George Manter and Betsey House Manter. He wed Priscilla Hillburn on October 4, 1843, and they had two daughters.

Nathan learned the cooper's trade, and at the age of seventeen he shipped out of Nantucket in 1835 on his first whaling voyage, on the ship Congress under the command of Captain William Upham. Nathan sailed as boatsteerer on July 14, 1839, again with Captain Upham, this time on the ship Sarah. He was second mate on the Arnold of New Bedford, MA, under the command of Captain David Coffin. In 1848, he sailed as mate with Captain John Stanton on the Java out of New Bedford. In 1854, Captain Manter commanded the schooner William P. Dolliver on a whaling cruise. After this voyage Captain Manter entered the service of the Nantucket Steamboat Company and remained in the employ of the company until his death in 1897.

Captain Manter's funeral service was held at his home on Federal Street. Many businesses and stores were closed, flags throughout town were flown at half-mast, and the steamer Island Home's bell tolled as a token of respect for her departed captain of thirty-one years.
 


Lot 25  Captain George Luce.  July 20, 1787 - December 18, 1864.
George was the son of Jason Luce of Martha's Vineyard. He married Eliza Lamb.
He was Master of the sloop Sally on the April 2, 1816 to August 2, 1816 voyage, of the brig
Prince George on the January 7, 1819 to May 8, 1822 voyage and of the sloop Iris on the voyage of 1827.
 


Lot 28  Rear Admiral Seth Ackley. October 13, 1846 - February 7, 1908.
Seth was the son of Captain Enoch Ackley and Charlotte Swain Ackley Pearson.
His father died at sea while in command of the ship “Potomac” on January 2, 1855. 
Seth married Edith Cash of Philadelphia, PA on June 5, 1879. He resided at 15 Orange Street. A house built in 1831 by Philip H. Folger (See Lot 144) and once owned by Cyrus Pierce (See Lot 148).

Seth was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR). He graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1866 and rose to the rank of captain, retiring in 1901. By an Act of Congress, he was reinstated in 1904 and promoted to captain on the Active List and rear admiral in February 1907. During his career, he was hydrographic inspector of the U.S. Coast Survey and Naval Secretary of the Lighthouse Board. Rear Admiral Ackley died in Washington on February 7, 1908.

In Nantucket: A History, Douglas-Lithgow related an event illustrating Ackley’s valor:
It is not generally known, nor is it recorded in the files of the Navy Department, that Admiral Ackley, when a lieutenant, nobly risked his life, in 1873, in trying to save a seaman who had fallen overboard from his ship, the Omaha. The Lieutenant, divesting himself of his coat and shoes, plunged in after him, in a rolling sea infested with man-eating sharks, and only after considerable difficulty was he himself saved when two miles away from his ship. The poor fellow, whom Lieutenant Ackley so bravely tried to save, was injured by striking the rail of the ship in falling, and, probably thus rendered unconscious, soon sank in the deep to rise no more.”

Douglas-Lithgow also wrote of the interment of Admiral Ackley:

Admiral Ackley is buried on Nantucket within the sound of the sea he loved, on the island which was the dearest spot of earth to him.”

Inscribed on Admiral Ackley's marker: "HOME IS. THE SAILOR. HOME FROM SEA."

 


Lot 32 South Side. Robert F. Parker Riddell. d. September 20, 1834.
Robert was the oldest of rope maker William H. Riddell and Eliza Ann Pollard Riddell's two sons. He was the nephew of Captain George Pollard, Jr. master of the ill-fated whaleship Essex.

Vital Records of Nantucket, Massachusetts, to the Year 1850, published in 1925 by New England Genealogical Society, recorded the marker's information. This verifies there was a marker prior to the publication date; there is no stone at the grave today.

Robert F. Parker Riddell's notice of death in the Nantucket Inquirer stated:
"DIED...
On Saturday evening, after a few hours illness, Robert F. P. Riddell only child of Mr. Wm. H. Riddell, aged 3 years."
 




Lot 36 South Side. Albert Pinkham. 1818 - September 8, 1841.
Albert was the son of Captain Stephen Pinkham and Elizabeth Chadwick Pinkham. He was three years old when his father died in Havana, Cuba. A sailmaker, Albert never married. He died of consumption on Nantucket at the age of twenty-three.
 




Lot 38  Captain William H. Bennett. November 4, 1813 - March 8, 1889.
William was the son of William Bennett and Phebe Raymond Bennett. He married Sarah D. Morse.
Captain Bennett was a successful whaleman. When he retired from the sea, Captain Bennett became a farmer and was in the
"shoe business".
 


Lot 38  Sarah Bennett. August 10, 1826 - December 16, 1892.
Sarah was the daughter of Arnold Morse and Maria (Pamela) Morey Morse. She was the wife of Captain William H. Bennett.
 


Lot 39 South Side  Roland Coffin. February 9, 1806 - February 23,1824.
Roland was the son of Captain Alfred Coffin and Peggy Chase Coffin. Natives at the Mulgrave Islands (part of the Marshall Islands) killed him at the age of eighteen . Roland is listed on the manifest of the Globe a Nantucket ship.

The Globe sailed out of Martha's Vineyard on December 20, 1822 for a whaling voyage around Cape Horn. A mutiny
resulting in the murders of the Captain, first mate, second mate and third mate occurred. Samuel Comstock, 
who then sailed the Globe to the Mulgrave Islands, led the mutiny. Six crew members escaped, who later giving depositions to the U.S. Consul at Valparaiso, Chile, cut the lines and sailed to Chile leaving the other seamen behind. Comstock was shot by his accomplices, for giving clothes and other items to the natives, before the items had been divided.  When the schooner Dolphin arrived at the islands and found William Lay and Cyrus Hussey, the only survivors, the others, including Roland Coffin having been killed by the natives.

Gorham Coffin, one of the owners of the Globe and Roland's uncle was outraged at the accounts in the depositions implying Roland was suspected of having knowledge of the mutiny, and was an informant to Comstock about the crew after the mutiny. He wrote to Secretary of State John Quincy Adams "not wishing to extenuate his fault, if guilty,
but to prevent if possible that aught may be set down in malice." He also wrote to Secretary of the Navy Samuel L.
Southard "while justice is stern, may not her sister virtue, mercy, be awed into silence, but be ready to extend her
shield, over those who have been forced to yield to necessity, with a drawn sword over their heads." Having this
letter forwarded to Commodore Hull and writing to Daniel Webster with the argument in Roland's defense as the
the crew was jealous of Roland due to his hard work and being related to owners of the ship.

Inscribed on Roland and Betsey Coffin's marker:

                                                                                    IN
                                                                            MEMORY OF                        
                                                                       ROLAND & BETSEY
                                                                             Children of                           
                                                                  ALFRED & PEGGY COFFIN                     
                                                                              ROLAND                              
                                                                       Born Feb. 9th 1806
                                                                         Died Feb. 23 1824  
                                                                        At Mulgrave Islands                         
                                                                              BETSEY                
                                                                        Born June 22 1807
                                                                        Died Nov. 1st 1826                                                                        
 


Lot 39 South Side Betsey Parker Coffin June 22, 1807 - Nov. 1, 1826
Betsey was the second of three children born to Captain Alfred Coffin and Peggy Chase Coffin (Riddell).
 


Lot 40 South Side Mary Ann Coffin 1809 - November 26, 1823.
Mary Ann was the youngest of Captain Alfred Coffin and Peggy Chase Coffin (Riddell) three children.
 


Lot 41  Captain James Wyer January 20, 1816 - June 10, 1899
James was the son of Obed Wyer, Jr. and Polly Gorham Wyer. His first wife was Harriett (Hattie) Thompson. Second wife was
Lois N. Pease Starbuck (widow of Captain Charles Starbuck). He spent his retirement in the "Cap'ns' Rooms" at the Pacific Club, of which he was one of the original purchasers. You may view his photographic c. 1840's portrait in the
Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number C182.
 


Lot 41  Hattie T. Wyer  1822 - March 21, 1860.
Hattie was the daugher of James Thompson and Dianna Gibbs Thompson. She was the first wife of Captain James Wyer.
You may view her photographic portrait in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number P1561.
 


Lot 41  Polly Wyer. d. February 26, 1858.
Polly was the daugher of Jonathan Gorham and Mary Davis Gorham. Wife of Obed Wyer.
 


Lot 51  Captain William Miller. 1814 - November 12, 1853.
William was the son of John Miller and Avis Worth Miller. Married Mary Ann Coffin. 
Captain Miller was master of the bark Lady Suffolk. He died at sea during this voyage at the age of thirty-nine.
 


Lot 54 South Side Mary Gelston. July 24, 1793 – July 6, 1813.
Mary was the third of Thaddeus Coffin and Ann Parker Coffin’s six children. She was the first wife of Samuel Gelston, son of Dr. Roland Gelston and Love Pinkham Gelston. Samuel was the grandson of  Dr. Samuel Gelston, a leader in inoculation in Massachusetts when smallpox was an epidemic.
For a brief time, Dr. Gelston had several hospitals for the treatment of patients who had been inoculated for smallpox, one located on Gravelly Island off Nantucket.

Mary was nineteen years old when she married Samuel on June 12, 1812. The couple’s daughter, Mary Jr., was born on May 13, 1813. Mary died on Nantucket at twenty years of age. Kezia Coffin Fanning (lot 64 South Side) wrote in her diary of the days leading up to Mary’s death.

“July 6 – Mary Gelston, wife of Samuel died this a. m. had a daughter weeks ago, has been unwell since. Last Wednesday went to Sconset with her husband, was worse for ride, began to cough last eve and coughed almost without cessation till a few minutes before death.”
 


Lot 54  Gorham Macy. January 9, 1793 - March 14, 1857.
Gorham was the son of Peleg Macy and Sally Wendall Macy. He married Lucretia Clark in 1813. In 1835, he purchased land from Philip H. Folger for $500.00 and built a house now known by two names, the Gorham Macy House and the Holland House, located at 39 India Street. Gorham was an autioneer and a shipowner.
 


Lot 54  George Macy. November 23, 1814 - July 8, 1895.
George was the son of Gorham Macy and Lucretia Clark Macy. He married Ann Crosby. In 1839, George purchased 39 India Street from his father for $2,500.00.
 


Lot 54  Charles G. Macy.  June 4, 1819 - September 1864. 
Charles was the son of Gorham Macy and Lucretia Clark Macy. During the Civil War he served as a private in
the 18 Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. He is listed in the National Park Service's Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System recorded on his information card at Andersonville "he was captured on May 15, 1864, Wilderness, VA."
He died a prisoner of war at the infamous Andersonville Prison in Sumter County, Georgia.

Inscribed on Charles G. Macy's marker:
                                                                                         Erected 
                                                                                     to the memory
                                                                                             of 
                                                                                Charles G. Macy of the
                                                                                      18 Mass vol.
                                                                                        Militia Died 
                                                                                  Andersonville Prison
                                                                                        Sept 1864 
                                                                                           AE 46.
 


Lot 55 Captain Charles E. Starbuck May 3, 1816 - May 30, 1863.
Charles was the son of Charles Starbuck and Eliza Allen Starbuck. He was the brother-in-law of Captain William Holley, who married Charle's sister Delia (See Lot 655). He was the first husband of Lois Pease Starbuck Wyer.Captain Starbuck was in command of the bark Peru that sailed from Nantucket on July 16, 1851, and returned on May 31, 1855. He was master of the bark Islander sailed from New Bedford for the Pacific Ocean on August 26, 1856 and returned 1861.


Lot 55  Mary Eliza Holley (Holly). 1835 – July 28, 1853.
Mary Eliza was the daughter of Captain William Holley  (See Lot 655)and Delia M. Starbuck Holley.
She was the niece of Captain Charles E. Starbuck. She died at the age of eighteeen.


Lot 55  Nancy R. “Nannie” Holley (Holly). 1839 – March 29, 1857. 
Nannie was the daughter of Captain William Holley  (See Lot 655) and Delia M. Starbuck Holley.
She was the niece of Captain Charles E. Starbuck. Nannie died at the age of eighteen from typhoid.


Mary Eliza “Molly” Starbuck’s chronicle is an excerpt from Prospect Hill Cemetery Association's book,
Tuck't In: A Walking Tour of Historic Prospect Hill Cemetery Nantucket, Massachusetts (page 37).
Please note: included with her chronicle is Molly’s portrait by Elizabeth Rebecca Coffin, courtesy of the Nantucket Historical Association.

Lot 55 Mary Eliza “Molly” Starbuck. March 13, 1856 – June 4, 1938.
Molly was the younger of two children born to Captain Charles E. Starbuck and Martha’s Vineyard-born Lois Pease Starbuck. She was born at her Grandmother Eliza Allen Starbuck’s house on Starbuck’s Court. Molly sailed at the age of five months on August 19, 1856, on the bark Islander with her father in command of the vessel, returning home in June 9, 1861. Molly’s father passed away when she was seven years old, and, in 1866, Molly was ten years old when her mother married the widower Captain James Wyer. Molly taught for a brief time, but at the end of the twelve-week term found she had lost twelve pounds. She went on vacation to Andover, Massachusetts, for a visit with her brother, Henry, who had been teaching at Phillips Academy. When Molly returned to Nantucket, she realized teaching was not the career she wanted. Molly was an author, poet, and Nantucket historian. She was the founding secretary of the Nantucket Historical Association. She is the author of My House and I, An Islander’s Love, and a collection of poetry titled Nantucket and Other Verses. An example of her lovely descriptive poetry is found at the beginning of her book:

NANTUCKET
Just a sandy wind-swept island!
What more would you have it be,
With a turquoise sky above it,
Around it a sapphire sea?

When its dawns are pearl and opal,
Its noons are crystal clear,
And its sunsets shower down gold dust
Till the diamond stars appear --

When to those who are born on the island,
And to many from over the sea,
‘Tis fairer  then all its jewels,
What more does it need to be?

Molly served as secretary to the Volunteer Aid Society of Nantucket. This organization was a branch of the Volunteer Air of Massachusetts serving to raise money and collect clothing for soldiers in the Spanish-American War. She resided at 8 Pleasant Street.



Click on the link to view Mary Eliza "Molly" Starbuck's obituary in The Inquirer and Mirror, Saturday, June 11, 1938.
 


Lois N. Pease Starbuck Wyer’s chronicle is an excerpt from Prospect Hill Cemetery Association's book,
Tuck't In: A Walking Tour of Historic Prospect Hill Cemetery Nantucket, Massachusetts
(pages 36 & 37).

Lot 55  Lois Pease Starbuck Wyer. October 30, 1823 - June 13, 1904.
Lois was born in Edgartown, MA the daughter of Henry Pease and Mary Fisher Pease. She was the wife of two whaling captains. Lois wed her first husband Captain Charles E. Starbuck, in 1846 and they had two children, Henry (b. 1851) and Mary Eliza "Molly" (b. 1856).

Molly Starbuck wrote of her mother's romance in her memoir My House and I. His ship readied for sea, Charles appeared at Lois's house one morning:

  After meeting Mother three times, he comes to the house one bitter cold morning before daylight and routed out Grandfather and asked to see Mother. His ship was to sail at sunrise. Mother dressed hastily, and, wrapped in a big shawl, descended to the room where Father waited.
The hearth-fire of course was out.
 When toward the end of her life, Mother told me the story, it seemed to me a trifle out of the ordinary for a girl to receive a caller before daylight, and in a freezing room, too; but I let that pass. When the story was told, I did exclaim, "But surely you couldn't engage yourself to marry a man after seeing him only three times!" "Well" said Mother serenely "I told him he might come back!"
 That was a wooing worthy of the pair.


Lois was the second wife of her second husband, Captain James Wyer (lot 41). They married on March 25, 1866, the Reverend Samuel D. Hosmer, of the First Congregational Church, officiating.

Lois was interred at Prospect Hill Cemetery on June 16, 1904, Ezra W. Lewis undertaker.
 


Lot 57  James Walter Folger.  January 31,1851 - October 28, 1918.
James was the son of Joseph W. Folger and Phebe Ann Thompson Folger and the great grandson of Hon. Walter Folger, Jr. He was the twin of Joseph Wyer Folger, who died from canker rash at the age of two on February 12, 1853, and the younger brother of Mary Folger. James's father died when James was three years old, and his mother passed away in 1861, leaving James orphaned at the age of ten.

James graduated from Nantucket High School in 1869 and moved to Cambridge, MA, where he apprenticed with an ornamental wood carver. He worked as a journeyman while there and returned home to Nantucket in 1874. James began pictorial woodcarving in the 1870s. These were scenes carved in relief on wood panels and painted to produce a three-dimensional work of art. He also created bird, duck, and animal head carvings. In addition, James painted in oil and watercolors. His work is part of the Nantucket Historical Association collection, with a number of his relief wood panels on exhibit at the Whaling Museum. James studio was on Union Street.

Click on the link to view James Walter Folger's obituary in The Inquirer and Mirror, November 2, 1918.
 


Lot 57  Joseph W. Folger. 1812 - April 25, 1854. 
Joseph was the son of Polly and Hon. Walter Folger, Jr.  He married Phebe Ann Thompson. 
While a captain in the merchant service, he was lost at sea and drowned at the age of forty-two in Mendocino, CA. Joseph was the father of artist/carver James Walter Folger.
 


Lot 57  Phebe Ann Folger. 1815 - January 7, 1861. 
Phebe was the daughter of James Thompson and Diana Gibbs Thompson. She married Joseph W. Folger.
Phebe was the mother of Artist/Carver James Walter Folger whose work is in the Nantucket Historical Association
and private collections. Phebe was forty-five years old when whe died from "disease of the heart". You may view her photographic portrait in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number P1197A.


Lot 57 "Little" Joseph Wyer Folger. January 31, 1851 - February 12, 1853.
Joseph was the son of Joseph W. Folger and Phebe Ann Thompson Folger. He was the twin of artist/carver James W. Folger. Joseph died from canker rash, a form of scarlet fever, at the age of two.


Lot 60  Seth C. Chace (Chase). October 30,1833 - April 3, 1865.
Seth was the son of Captain Frederick B. Chase and Phebe Allen Chase.
He was imprisoned in Salisbury Prison, North Carolina during the Civil War. Returned home to Nantucket.
Died three weeks after he arrived home at the age of thirty-one.


Lot 60  Captain Frederic (Frederick) B. Chace (Chase). August 11, 1795 - May 14, 1873.
Frederick was the son of Otis Chase and Betsey Chase. He married Phebe Allen on November 14, 1824. Captain Chace was master of ships Omega, Alpha and Fabius.


Lot 61  Captain Edenezer Coleman. March 2, 1795 - January 23, 1872.
Ebenezer was the son of Henry Coleman and Susan Harris Coleman. He married Lydia Ray. Captain Coleman was master of the ship Mariner on the voyage of August 12, 1832 to 1836.


Lot 61  Lydia Coleman. July 30, 1806 - January 16, 1888.
Lydia was the daughter of George Ray and Deborah Folger Ray. She was the wife of Captain Ebenezer Coleman.
 


Lot 64 South Side.  Kezia Coffin Fanning. January 5, 1759 - November 20, 1820.  
Kezia was a direct descendant of Tristram Coffin, one of the first settlers of Nantucket, and the only child of John Coffin and Kezia Folger Coffin. She married attorney Phineas Fanning April 5, 1777. Kezia's mother was the infamous Kezia Coffin who during the Revolutionary War arranged with the British to allow whale oil and candles to be shipped to Britain, and other goods to be smuggled on island. She hid these and sold the merchandise at inflated prices. 

Kezia began keeping a diary at the age of sixteen in 1775 until her death in 1820. Her diary records daily events on Nantucket during this historic time. You may view a photograph of her portrait in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number 1952.23.1.

Inscribed on Kezia's marker:

Sacred to the memory of Mrs. Kezia Fanning
who departed this life
on the 20th of November 1820.
In the 62nd year of her age
Rest wearied dust:
In the bosom of the earth
Rest happy spirit!
In the bosom of they GOD.
 


Lot 66  Captain Franklin Chase. September 8, 1789 - March 12,1825.
Franklin was the son of Issac Chase and Eunice Brown Chase. He married Nancy Ellis in 1816. While master of the ship North America he died at sea at the age of thirty-six.
 


Lot 66 Priscilla M. Almy. April 15, 1819 - May 6, 1897.
Priscilla was the daughter of Captain Franklin Chase and Nancy Ellis Chase. She was six years old when her father, Captain Chase, died at sea. Priscilla was the second wife of Tillinghast Almy who, according to the Eliza Starbuck Genealogical Record, came from Providence, RI. The couple married on October 16, 1860, they were recorded in the 1870 U.S. Federal Census as residing in Providence, RI, where Tillinghast's occupation was auctioneer. Tillinghast passed away in 1875, and the 1880 U.S. Federal Census shows Priscilla living back on Nantucket. Priscilla was the postmistress of ’Sconset from 1883 to 1891. The editor of the Whalemen's Shipping List and Merchants' Transcript wrote in the July 28, 1885, edition:

One hundred and ten members of The Massachusetts Press Association, took a trip to Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket. In Nantucket, they were put up at the new hotel, The Nantucket, located at Brant Point, close to the water. The party went to  Siasconset on the railroad. It was the first visit in over 80 years for the editor of "Whalemen's Shipping List," and he noted many changes, including the many new cottages and hotels. Mr. Joseph S. Barney, of Nantucket a boyhood friend of the editor, took him around the town of Siasconset. Also met there was Mrs. Priscilla M. Almy, the postmistress, whom he [the editor] had known when he was a young man. A wonderful trip was had by all.

The editor was most likely Nantucket-born Ebenezer "Eben" P. Raymond (lot 300), editor and later owner of the Whalemen's Shipping List and Merchants' Transcript.
 


Lot 66  Nancy Chase. April 4, 1789 - August 10, 1852.
Nancy was the daughter of Simeon Ellis and Deborah Long Ellis. She married Franklin Chase in 1816.
 


Lot 67  Captain George Palmer. October 1, 1807 - July 28, 1880.
George was the son of Lot Palmer and Ruth Clasby Palmer. He married his first wife Eliza Swain on January 27, 1833. He and his second wife Mary Ann Swain Starbuck, were married on August 8, 1854. Mary Ann was the widow of Reuben Starbuck and the younger sister of Captain Palmer's first wife, Eliza. Captain Palmer commanded several ships out of New Bedford. He was master of the ship Navigator of Nantucket.
 


Lot 67  Mary Ann Palmer. January 11, 1816 - February 20, 1887.
Mary was the daughter of Captain Owen and Abigail Swain Swain. Mary's first husband  was mariner Reuben Starbuck. They married on May 6, 1835. Mary Ann and Reuben's only child, Eliza was born on July 13, 1851. Mary Ann and her second husband Captain George Palmer were married by George Cobb, Justice of the Peace, on August 8, 1854, and their daughter, Maria, was born in 1856.
 


Lot 67  Lot Palmer. November 5, 1783 - August 5, 1871.
Married Ruth Clasby. Father of Captain George Palmer.
Lot was an eighty-seven-year-old carpenter when he died from "general debility" and "old age" on Nantucket.
 


Lot 67  Ruth Palmer. March 25, 1780 - January 7, 1859.
Married Lot Palmer. Mother of Captain Geoge Palmer.
 


Lot 68  Captain Rufus Coffin. March 20,1819 - August 10, 1863.
Rufus was the son of Timothy G. Coffin and Betsey Parker Coffin. He married Winnifred B. Chase on November 14, 1844.
During the Civil War, Rufus served in the United States Navy. He was a captain in the United States Revenue Service.
 


Lot 68  Winnifred "Winnie" B. Coffin. November 17, 1819 - November 17, 1897.
Winnie was the only child of Daniel Chase and Anna Bunker Chase. She was fifteen years old when her father died in 1834 in New York. Her mother was the second wife of prominent ship builder Frederick Mitchell; they wed in 1844. Winnie was the wife of Captain Rufus Coffin.


Lot 68  Annie Bunker Chase Mitchell. April 3, 1797 - April 4, 1875.
Annie was the daughter of Latham Bunker and Susanna Barnard Bunker. Her first husband was Daniel Chase and her
second husband was Frederick W. Mitchell. You may view her photographic portraits in the
Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number P1361. Image Number P1362.


Lot 69 Eliza Starbuck Barney. April 9, 1802 - March 18, 1889.
Eliza was the daughter of Joseph Starbuck (shipowner, merchant and builder of The Three Bricks) and Sally Gardner Starbuck. She wed Nathaniel Barney on May 18, 1820. Eliza worked on a genealogical record of more than 40, 000 Nantucket families spanning over two and a half centuries, a work begun by Benjamin Franklin Folger.  She was deeply involved in both the women's suffrage and antislavery movements. Frederick Douglas was among the many prominent guests at 100 Main Street, the Barney's home. The Barneys continued to live at 100 Main Street until 1862 when they moved to William Hadwen's second home at 94 Main Street, before relocating to Poughkeepsie, NY, to be near their daughter and son-in-law Sarah and Alanson Swain.

Eliza moved back to Nantucket after the death of Nathaniel. She stayed with her son Jospeh until the home he built for her at 73 Main Street was completed in 1872. Eliza was eulogized as a "lifelong Quaker, liberal in her views and tolerant of the tenets of others."
 


Lot 69  Nathaniel Barney. December 31, 1792 - September 2, 1869. 
Nathaniel was the son of Jonathan Barney and Abial Coffin Barney. He married Eliza Starbuck on May 18, 1820.
Nathaniel went into partnership with his cousin William Hadwen as purveyors and manufacturers of oil and candles in the building that now houses the Whaling Museum.

Nathaniel and his wife Eliza were deeply involved in both the women's suffrage and the antislavery movements, which brought Nathaniel into contact with prominent abolitionists William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips, and John G. Whittier. When abolitionist
Stephen S. Foster, spoke at the Anti-Slavery Convention held on Nantucket in 1842, he caused a mob scene when he denounced the clergy in America for condoning and furthering the institution of slavery. The crowd threw eggs and stones at him, and Foster fled Nantucket in fear for his life. In July 1843, Foster wrote a letter to Nathaniel defending his position and referring to the United States clergy, denomination by denomination, as "the brotherhood of thieves". This letter was published in a pamphlet titled The Brotherhood of Thieves or a True Picture of the American Church and Clergy: A Letter to Nathaniel Barney of Nantucket. Nathaniel refused to receive the dividends from his stock in the New Bedford Railroad because black passengers were not permitted passage, Nathaniel eventually gave his dividends to William Lloyd Garrison to be used to benefit the antislavery movement.

Nathaniel and Eliza moved to Poughkeepsie, NY to live near their daughter Sarah Swain. Nathaniel died there at the age of seventy-six.

Click on the link to view Nathaniel Barney's obituary in The Inquirer and Mirror, September 11, 1869.

Click on the following link to view the published pamphlet The Brotherhood of Thieves or a True Picture of the American Church and Clergy: A Letter to Nathaniel Barney of Nantucket by Stephen S. Foster.
 


Lot 69  Joseph S. Barney. May 5, 1827 - December 22, 1905.
Joseph was the son of Nathanial Barney and Eliza Starbuck Barney. He was the grandson of Joseph Starbuck.
He married Melinda Swain on June 6, 1848. Upon the retirement of his father's partner William Hadwen, Joseph
went into his father's business along with his brother-in-law Alanson Swain.In 1864, after the death of Eunice Hadwen Joseph inherited 96 Main Street.  In the summer, the family moved to their cottage at 20 Main Street in Sconset. Originally named Green Chimneys, it was later changed to Solid Comfort. He built a house for his Mother at 73 Main Street when she returned to Nantucket after his Father's death.

Joseph was a prosperous man in his own right before he inherited the Hadwen estate. He was one of the early promoters of tourism as an economic strength for the island and, in his capacity as a director at the Steamboat Company, became involved in promoting the idea of "Two Boats a Day" to advance the recognition of Nantucket as a resort area. Joseph also owned fishing vessels, several stores, and warehouses. He was active in local politics, serving as town meeting moderator for twelve years, a member of the Town Finance Committee, and a delegate to the State Republican Convention.

Click on the link to view Joseph Barney's obituary in The Inquirer and Mirror, December 30, 1905.
 


Lot 70  Alanson Swain. September 1, 1818 - January 15, 1877. 
Alanson was the son of Captain Obed Swain and his first wife Eunice Carpenter Swain. On February 15, 1842, Alanson married his first wife, Eliza Lawrence, the daughter of Captain Charles Lawrence and Hepsabeth Bunker Lawrence, and the granddaughter of Sheriff Jeremiah Lawrence and Eunice Baxter Lawrence (lot 13 South Side). Tragically, after having been married only four years, Eliza died of consumption at the age of twenty-four.

Alanson wed his second wife, Sarah Starbuck Barney, in March 1852, and they had four children. Sarah was the sister of Alanson's brother-in-law, Joseph S. Barney (lot 69); Alanson was the son-in-law of Nathaniel and Eliza Starbuck Barney. Alanson worked with his brother-in-law, Joseph, and father-in-law, Nathaniel at the firm of Hadwen & Barney after William Hadwen's retirement. Later, Alanson moved his family to Poughkeepsie, NY. Lucile Barney Bell, the widow of William Hadwen Barney, a nephew of Alanson, recalled that "the Swains had a spacious home on the banks of the Hudson." In the 1870's, Alanson helped to finance the Pennsylvania and Eastern Railroads.


Lot 72 John Bowne King, MD. May 23, 1808 - July 27, 1889.
John was from New York, the son of John King of New Castle, England and Mary King of New York.
He married Mary B. Mitchell. John practiced medicine on whaling voyages and on Nantucket.
You may view his portrait in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number GPN1459.
 


Lot 74  Captain Robert M. Joy. March 8, 1793 - June 23, 1862.
Robert was the son of William Joy and Jedida Meader Joy. Brother of Captain George F. Joy (see Lot 87)
and Captain Edward C. Joy (see Lot 466). Married Sally J. Hussey. Captain Joy was master of the ships Atlas and Rodman.
 


Lot 74  Sarah "Sally" J. Joy. April 24, 1799 - December 10, 1882.
Sally was the daughter of Charles F. Hussey and Sarah Jenkins Hussey. She was the sister of Captain Isaac B. Hussey, who was killed during a mutany aboard the ship William Penn in 1852. Sally was the wife of Captain Robert M. Joy. Sally's death was recorded as December 10, 1882, in the Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841 - 1910; however, December 11, 1882, is engraved on her marker.


Lot 74  George Fitch. January 1, 1800 - December 29, 1870.
George was the son of Obed Fitch and Miriam Gardner Fitch. He married Eliza Hussey, the sister of Sarah "Sally" Hussey Joy.
George's occupation was a gauger. A revenue officer who inspects bulk goods that is subject to a duty.


Lot 77 Sylvanus Ewer. October 4, 1767 - March 3, 1836.
Sylvanus was the son of Seth Ewer and Lydia Churchill Ewer. His first wife was Anna Crosby. His second wife was
Margaret "Peggy" Folger. His third wife was Phebe Pease Nye. His fourth wife was Eunice Hussey.
Sylvanus was a ship's carpenter who came to Nantucket from Osterville. He went on to become a very successful
whaling merchant and manufacturer of oil and candles.

In 1805, Sylvanus purchased from Nathan Nye (first husband of his third wife) 19 Union Street now known as the "Sylvanus Ewer House". This property was passed on to his son Peter who passed it on to his second wife Mary who passed it on to their daughter Margaret who passed it on to her daughter Mary who passed it on to her brother Frank.
You may view the data pages and photographs in The Library of Congress American Memory's Historic American Building Survey/Historic Engineering Record.

Please visit our photo gallery to see the Ewer Lot monument.


Lot 77  Eunice H. Ewer. July 15, 1780 - October 19, 1847.
Eunice was the daughter of Stephen Hussey and Rose Barnard Hussey. She was the fourth wife of Sylvanus Ewer.

Please visit our photo gallery to see the Ewer Lot monument.


Lot 77  Peter Ewer. March 8, 1800 - January 7, 1855.
Peter was the son of Sylvanus Ewer and Margaret (Peggy) Folger Ewer. His first wife was Eunice Cartwright. Peter's second wife was Mary Cartwright. He was the inventor of "the camels", a floating dry-dock, designed to lift loaded whale ships and carry them over the sandbar. They were named after a similar device invented in Holland.  You may see a model of "the camels" at The Whaling Museum. As a young man, he purchased and placed the eight milestones from Nantucket to Sconset. The tradition from the family is his children and children's children to the family's final generation should keep the milestones painted white. In 1836, Peter inherited 19 Union Street from his father.
You may view a portrait of Peter Ewer attributed to William Swain in the Nantucket Historical Association collection.

Please visit our photo gallery to see the Ewer Lot monument.
 


Lot 77  Mary Cartwright Ewer. November 6, 1797 - November 20, 1877.
Mary was the daughter of John Cartwright and Mary Starbuck Cartwright. She was the second wife of Peter Ewer. Her sister
Eunice Cartwright was her husband's first wife. You may view her portrait c. 1828 attributed to William Swain in the
Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number 1986.30.2.
She inherited 19 Union Street "Sylvanus Ewer House" from her husband in 1855. Mary died from typhoid fever in New York.

Please visit our photo gallery to see the Ewer Lot monument.
 


Lot 77  Margaret F. Coffin. January 26, 1833 -  September 21,1907.
Maraget was the daughter of Peter F. Ewer and Mary Cartwright Ewer. Married Charles E. Coffin. Inherited 19 Union Street
"Sylvanus Ewer House" from her mother in 1877. Margaret passed away at her home on Union Street at the age of seventy-four.

Please visit our photo gallery to see the Ewer Lot monument.
 


Lot 77  Charles E. Coffin. February 11, 1828 - March 21, 1889.
Charles was the son of David U. Coffin and Adaline Coffin. He married Margaret F. Ewer on September 13, 1855. Charles was a dry goods merchant.

Please visit our photo gallery to see the Ewer Lot monument.
 


Lot 77  Mary E. Denham. May 27, 1857 - March 5, 1909.
Mary was the daughter of Charles E. Coffin and Margaret Ewer Coffin. She married Frederick Denham June 1, 1887.
Mary inherited 19 Union Street "Sylvanus Ewer House" from her mother in 1906. Upon her death the house was bequeathed
to her brother Frank Coffin. Mary died in New York from pneumonia. Her interment took place on March 9, 1909. Israel M. Lewis undertaker.

Please visit our photo gallery to see the Ewer Lot monument.
 


Lot 78 South Side  Peter Hussey. January 26, 1775 - March 8, 1815.
Peter was the son of Batchelder Hussey and Anna Coffin Hussey. He married Mary Mooers July 5, 1794 (her first husband). He
withdrew from the Society of Friends 1810. Listed as "Proprietors of Second Congregational Church meetinghouse"
April 26, 1810. Peter was killed when thrown from his carriage at forty-one. He was Deputy Grand Master of 12th Masonic District, according to his obituary in March 15, 1815 edition of  Columbia Centinel.
 


Lot 79  Captain Zephaniah Wood. February 9, 1784 - 1823.
He married Martha Rice Gardner, widow of Captain Frederick Gardner in 1809. Father of Captain Albert Wood (Lot 426).
Master of whaleship Triton. He died at sea at the age of thirty-five and was buried on an island. The monument at Prospect Hill is a memorial to Captain Wood. 
 


Lot 79 South Side  Captain William Worth. June 18, 1794 - March 8, 1880.
William was the son of Richard Worth and Phebe Hayden Worth. He was the brother of Captain Shubael Worth (see Lot 320).
His first wife was Nancy McCleave, his second wife was Lucretia Swain and his third wife was Valina Swain.


Lot 80  Benjamin Swain. 1754 - August 8, 1820.
Benjamin was the son of Jethro Swain and Dorcus Ryder Swain. Married Phebe Meader. He resided at 15 Union Street. The house is
known as the "William Nichols House" a.k.a. the "Timothy G. Clapp House". In 1819, William purchased the house from the Estate of William Nichols "land dwelling house and outbuilding thereon standing" for $1,400.00. One year later, he died of "cholera morbus". His widow Phebe Meader Swain sold the house to Timothy Clapp in 1825 for $1,300.00. 


Lot 81 South Side.  Captain Wyer Swain. September 15, 1768 - May 18, 1815.
Wyer was the son of Daniel Swain and Elizabeth Wyer Swain. Married Rebecca Hayden.
He purchased 28 Orange Street now known as the "Tupper-Folger House" from the Estate of Benjamin Tupper, M.D. in 1798. His widow, Rebecca sold the house in 1816 to Thomas Varney MackCleave for $2,000.00. You may view
the data pages and photographs in The Library of Congress American Memory's Historic American Building Survey/Historic Engineering Record.


Lot 82  Charles K. Whitman. August 25, 1792 - October 6, 1852.
Charles was the son of Kilborn Whitman. He married Eliza Morselander. Charles was a lawyer. You may view his photographic portrait
c. 1840's in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number C174.


Lot 83 Charles Coffin Swift. November 9, 1819 - January 27, 1820.
Charles was the infant son of Reverend Seth F. Swift, the first minister at the Second Congregational Meeting House Society, known today as the Unitarian Church and Valina Rawson Swift.
 


Lot 83  Captain Hiram Bailey. November 12, 1812 - May 31, 1856.
Hiram was the son of Benjamin Bailey and Abigail "Nabby" Folger Gurill Bailey. Brother of Captain Stephen Bailey (Lot 481).
He married Phebe J. Folger (Lot 481) on July 31, 1836..When master of the schooner Watchman he drowned at Bonavista while trying to land his boat in heavy surf.


Lot 83  Miss Eliza Bailey. September 9, 1809 - April 18, 1841.
Eliza was the daughter of Benjamin Bailey and Abigail "Nabby" Folger Gurill Baily. She was the sister of Captain Hiram Bailey (See Lot 83) and Captain Stephen Bailey (See Lot 481). Eliza was a teacher at the African School.

Please visit our photo gallery to see Miss Eliza Baily's marker.
 


Lot 87  Captain George F. Joy. September 27, 1796 - July 8, 1876.
George was the son of William Joy and Jedida Meader Joy.Brother of Captain Robert M. Joy (see Lot 74)
and Edward C. Joy (see Lot 466). He married Ann Coggeshall. Captain Joy was master of  ships Boston, Golden Farmer, Zenas Coffin, Charles and Henry, and Columbia. You may view his photographic portrait in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image P1288.
 


Lot 87  Anna C. Joy. April 9, 1799 - August 26, 1853.
Anna was the daughter of Peleg Coggeshall and Deborah Folger Coggeshall. She is the wife of Captain George F. Joy.
You may view her photographic portrait in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number P1289.
 


Lot 88  William Starbuck. December 28, 1815 - April 25, 1873.
William was the son of Joseph Starbuck and Sally Gardner Starbuck. He married Sarah Allen in 1836. 
William lived in The East Brick. Built as one of The Three Bricks by his father Joseph Starbuck. In 1850 William was deeded the property at 93 Main Street from his father. In 1873 by will, the property was in trust for his wife
Sarah M. Starbuck then equally to their children Walter Starbuck, Martha Fenton, Joseph A. Starbuck and
Alfred Starbuck. In 1888, Gardner J. Kingman purchased the property from the four heirs taking it out of the Starbuck family. 
 


Lot 88  Sarah Starbuck. December 26, 1816 - September 11, 1885.
Sarah was the daughter of Captain Joseph Allen and Abigail Coffin Allen.She was the sister of Eunice Allen Sherman, wife
of Captain William Sherman. (See Lot 93). Sarah was the wife of William Starbuck.
 


Lot 88  Alfred Starbuck. January 29, 1838 - December 12, 1921.
Alfred was the son of William Starbuck and Sarah Allen Starbuck. He was the grandson of Joseph Starbuck and Captain Joseph Allen. Alfred married Elizabeth Maroney on November 25, 1870.
 


Lot 88 Thorton Starbuck. February 28, 1850 - August 22, 1850.
Thorton was the son of William Starbuck and Sarah Allen Starbuck. He was the grandson of Joseph Starbuck and Captain Joseph Allen.
Thorton died at six months old from consumption.
 


Lot  89 Matthew Starbuck. October 28, 1813 - January 4, 1876.
Matthew was the son of Joseph Starbuck and Sally Gardner Starbuck. He married his first wife Mary Ann Morton in 1835. He married his second wife Catharine Wyer in 1840. Matthew lived in The Middle Brick. Built as one of The Three Bricks by his father Joseph Starbuck. In 1850 Matthew was deeded the property at 95 Main Street from his father. In 1876, he died intestate and the property passed to his wife Catharine Starbuck and their four children. Also in 1876, Catharine purchased all interest from their children. Maria Starbuck Mackay purchased the shares in the house from her siblings in 1815. After her death in 1920, her daughter Pauline M. Smith inherited the property from her mother. In 1948, Pauline Smith Freeman was deeded the property by her mother Pauline M.(Smith) Johnson.Matthew died from typhoid pneumonia at the age of sixty-two.


Lot 89  Catharine Wyer Starbuck. September 27, 1818 - February 23, 1913.
Catharine was the daughter of Captain Christopher Wyer(see Lot 130) and Priscilla Coleman Wyer.
She was the second wife of Matthew Starbuck.
 


Lot 89  Maria Mitchell Starbuck Mackay. February 20, 1850 - April 15, 1920.
Maria was the youngest of five children born to Matthew Starbuck and his second wife Catharine Wyer Starbuck. She was the granddaughter of prominent whaling merchant Joseph Starbuck (lot 90) and successful whaling master Captain Christopher Wyer (lot 130). Maria was named after her mother's friend astronomer Maria Mitchell (lot 411). Maria attended Vassar College where her name sake was professor of astronomy.

Maria married  Boston business man George H. Mackay, the son of Robert Caldwell and Charlotte Lodge Mackay on October 13, 1874. George recorded  his occupation as "East India Merchant" in the 1880 Federal Census. He worked in the East India trade firm of Mackay and Coolidge founded by George's father R. C. Mackay and J. S. Coolidge. George first traveled to India for the firm at the age of niineteen years. Maria and George had three children Pauline b. 1878, Robert b. 1884 and George, Jr. b. 1885. 

Maria and George first had a summer home on Nantucket at Main and Bloom Streets then in 1915, three years after the death of her mother, Maria purchased the shares from all the heirs to 95 Main Street and became the owner "The Middle Brick".

Click on the link to view Maria Mitchell Starbuck Mackay's memoriam by Anna Starbuck Jenks (lot 602) in The Inquirer and Mirror, Saturday, April 24, 1920.
 


Lot 89  Pauline Mackay (Smith) Johnson. September 4, 1878 - November 12, 1958.
Pauline was the daughter of George H. Mackay and Maria M. Starbuck Mackay. In 1920, she inherited 95 Main Street
"The Middle Brick" from her mother.
 


Lot 89  Pauline Smith Freeman. June 4, 1912 - March 16, 1993.
Pauline was the daughter of Pauline Mackay Smith Johnson. In 1948, her mother deeded the house at 95 Main Street
"The Middle Brick" to her and Pauline became the fourth generation of the Starbuck family to reside at 95 Main Street.
Pauline was also a resident of Farminton, CT and Naples, FL.
 


Lot 89  (Josiah) Bradlie Starbuck. April 6, 1844 - May 14, 1882.
(Josiah) Bradlie was the son of Matthew Starbuck (The Middle Brick) and Catharine Wyer Starbuck. He was the grandson of Joseph Starbuck and Captain Christopher Wyer. He married Anna E. Smith in 1868 at N.Y. Died in New Bedford at age thirty-eight.
 


Lot 89  Horace Starbuck. November 2, 1845 - October 17, 1914.
Horace was the son of Matthew Starbuck (The Middle Brick) and Catharine Wyer Starbuck. He was the grandson of Joseph Starbuck and Captain Christopher Wyer.
 


Lot 89  Caroline W. Spinney. May 11, 1842 - October 14, 1885.
Caroline was the daughter of Matthew Starbuck (The Middle Brick) and Catharine Wyer Starbuck. She was the granddaughter of
Joseph Starbuck and Captain Christopher Wyer. Caroline married her first husband, Edwin Merriam on December 29, 1864. She wed her second husband, William Spinney in 1879.
 


Lot 89  Robert S. Mackay. July 23, 1884 - August 10, 1933.
Robert was the son of George H. Mackay and Maria Starbuck Mackay. Great grandson of Joseph Starbuck and Captain Christopher Wyer.
 


Lot 90  George Starbuck. September 9, 1811 - February 14, 1888.
George was the son of Joseph Starbuck and Sally Gardner Starbuck. He married Elizabeth Swain on March 20, 1833.
George lived in (The West Brick). Built as one of The Three Bricks by Joseph Starbuck. In 1850 George was deeded the property at
97 Main Street from his father. After his death in 1888, through assignment of the mortgage, the
property went to his son Sidney Starbuck. In 1896, Sidney conveyed the house and land to his mother, Elizabeth Starbuck with a life estate and after her death to his sisters Ellen Starbuck Swain and Susan A. Starbuck. In 1922, the two sisters sold to Charles Minshall taking the house out of the Starbuck family.

You may view a portrait of George Starbuck by James Hathaway in the Nantucket Historical Association collection.
 


Lot 90  Elizabeth Swain Starbuck. December 26, 1812 - February 25, 1899.
Elizabeth was the daughter of successful whaling master Captain Jonathan Swain and Rachel Fish Swain (lot 356). She married
George Starbuck on March 20, 1833. Elizabeth was known as a gracious hostess entertaining people from all over the county. She was civic minded, and through her private philanthropy and hands-on activities she assumed a leadership role in local issues. She was president of the Relief Association and the Howard Society, both local charitable organizations. Elizabeth was the first vice president of the Nantucket Sorosis, a women's society, and one of the founding members and vice president of the Nantucket Historical Association, whose first meeting was held on May 9, 1894, in the west parlor of her home at 97 Main Street. You may view Elizabeth Swain Starbuck's photographic portrait in the Nantucket Historical Association collectin.

Click on the link to view Elizabeth Starbuck's obituary in The Inquirer and Mirror, Saturday, March 4, 1899.
 


Lot 90  Arthur Starbuck. December 8, 1845 - February 2, 1881.
Arthur was the son of George Starbuck (The West Brick) and Elizabeth Swain Starbuck. He was the grandson of Joseph Starbuck and Captain Jonathan Swain. Arthur married Grace F. Ropes, of Brooklyn, New York in 1870.
 


Lot 90  Susan A. Starbuck. January 8, 1849 - December 4, 1928.
Susan was the daughter of George Starbuck (The West Brick) and Elizabeth Swain Starbuck. She was the granddaughter of Joseph Starbuck and Captain Jonathan Swain. In 1892, Susan moved to Brooklyn, NY and in 1922, moved back to Nantucket.
 


Lot 90  Joseph Starbuck. February 27, 1774 - March 9, 1861.
Joseph was the son of Thomas Starbuck and Dinah Trott Starbuck. He married Sally Gardner on January 26, 1797. Joseph was a wealthy whaleship owner, merchant and builder of The Three Bricks for his three sons George, Matthew and William.
A few of the whaleships he owned were the "President", "Hero", "Omega" and "Three Brothers".
You may view his portrait in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number P9118.
 


Lot 90  Sally Gardner Starbuck. October 22, 1733 - April 5, 1842.
Sally was the daughter of Nathan Gardner and Anna Bunker Gardner. She married Joseph Starbuck on January 26, 1797
at the age of twenty-three.

Joseph and Sally Gardner Starbuck's markers.
 


Lot 90  Ellen Starbuck Swain. July 26, 1837 - February 12, 1931.
Ellen was the daughter of George Starbuck (The West Brick) and Elizabeth Swain Starbuck. She was the grandchild of Joseph Starbuck and Captain Jonathan Swain. Ellen married Edwin Swain in 1869.
 


Lot 90  Edwin Swain. March 3, 1829 - January 13, 1890.
Edwin was the son of Obed B. Swain and Eunice Carpenter Swain. He married Ellen Starbuck in 1869. Edwin's residence and place of death was Brooklyn, New York.
 


Lot 91  Mary Starbuck Swain. January 15, 1804 - June 11, 1893.
Mary was the daughter of Joseph Starbuck and Sally Gardner Starbuck. She married William C. Swain on November 28,1822, and they had nine children.
 


Lot 91  William C. Swain. May 18, 1801 - May 15, 1885.
William was the son of Thomas Swain and Deborah Cartwright Swain. He married Mary Starbuck in 1822. William was a merchant. He resided at what is now known as the William C. Swain House at 92 Main Street. The Greek Revival house is a two and a half
story clapboard on a high brick basement.
 


Lot 92 Rev. Augustus C. Swain. October 16, 1843 - September 23, 1933.
Augustus was the son of  William C. Swain and Mary Starbuck Swain. He was the grandson of Joseph Starbuck.
Augustus married Susan E. Coffin on August 13, 1873.
 


Lot 92  Philip S. Swain. April 1, 1838 - January 13, 1936.
Philip was the son of William C. Swain and Mary Starbuck Swain. He was the grandson of Joseph Starbuck.
In 1864, Philip married Ophelia F. Nason. In 1891, he was the first president of the Marion & Rye Valley Railroad. Philip died at Cranford, NJ at the age of ninety-seven. His recipe for longevity was total abstinence from candy and sweets and a frequent chew of dry codfish.
 


Lot 93 South Side.  Mary Weeks.  November 29, 1772 - November 10, 1839.
Mary was the daughter of Hezekiah Russell and Hepsabeth Allen Russell. She was the wife of Captain Joseph Weeks.
 


Lot 93 Captain William E. Sherman Lot. October 27, 1803 - 1860.
William was the son of Nathaniel Sherman and Hepsabeth Worth Sherman. Married Eunice Allen. Captain Sherman was master of the
ship Robert Kelly, a Liverpool packet of the black star line. He set sail in May 1859. Captain Sherman was lost at sea in 1860.
 


Lot 93  Alexander Sherman. June 1834 - April 7, 1843.
Alexander was the son of Captain William E. Sherman and Eunice Allen Sherman. He died at the age of nine.
 


Lot 93  Virginia Sherman. May 10, 1846 - April 20, 1847.
Infant daughter of Captain William E. Sherman and Eunice Allen Sherman.
 


Lot 93  Eunice Sherman. March 6, 1808 - September 25,1847.
Eunice was the daughter of  Captain Joseph Allen and Abigail Coffin Allen. Her youngest sister 
Sarah Allen Starbuck, was the wife of  William Starbuck (See Lot 88). Eunice married William Edwin Sherman on July 29, 1832.
Inscribed on her marker:

                                                                Eunice Sherman Wife of William Sherman
                                                                              died on Sept. 25, 1847
                                                                            In the 40th year of Her Age  
                                                                            As Daughter Wife & Mother
                                                                          She was all a woman should be


Lot 94 South Side.  Captain Joseph Weeks. February 13, 1773 - August 10, 1836.
Of Cape Cod. He married Mary Russell (See lot 93 South Side) on December 31, 1795. Captain Weeks died from" lingering consumption".
 


Lot 94  Captain David Cottle. March 16, 1775 - January 3, 1860.
David was the son of Lot Cottle and Ruth Coleman Cottle. His first wife was Mary Folger, and they had a daughter Rebecca. According to the Eliza Starbuck Barney Genealogical Record "they separated". David married his second wife, Rebecca Russell Cottle, the widow of Obed Cottle, on April 3, 1808. David and Rebecca had two sons George, who died at sea in 1824 and Obed.
 


Lot 94  Rebecca Russell Cottle. November 12, 1771 - January 23, 1857.
Rebecca was the daughter of Nathaniel Russell and Judith Long Russell. She married  her first husband Obed Cottle in 1796. Captain Cottle was "shot by one of his men on board ship round Cape Horn," "recd the News, __, 5 mo 1806." Rebecca and Obed had a daughter Nancy who passed away in 1820 at the age of twenty. Rebecca wed her second husband Captain David Cottle on April 3, 1808. Rebecca and David had two sons George and Obed.
 


Lot 97  Captain Richard Mitchell, Jr.  February 4, 1819 - February 20, 1888.
Richard, Jr. was the son of Richard Mitchell and Frances "Fanny" Lincoln Mitchell. Married Charlotte Morton. Retired Mariner.
Died in Boston.
 


Lot 97  Charlotte Mitchell. May 4, 1819 - August 19, 1900.
Charlotte was the daughter of Dr. Martin T. Morton and Mary Carey Morton. She was the wife of Captain Richard Mitchell.
 


Lot 99  Captain William S. Chase. July 18, 1812 - January 31, 1881.
William was the son of Stephen Chase and Peggy Barnard Chase. He married Betsey Smith on April 13, 1837.
 


Lot 104  William H. Myrick. 1837 - November 14, 1877.
William was the son of William C. Myrick and Mary Colesworthy Myrick. He was the first husband of Mary Jane Gardner.
William was a twenty-five-year-old shoemaker when he enlisted as a private in the 20th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry on
August 12, 1862. He accidentally discharged his shoulder musket while carrying a corpse off the
battlefield at Fredericksburg. He was discharged June 5, 1863 for disability due to chronic diarrhea. Moved to Brockton, MA.
Worked as shoemaker in a factory, quit due to fainting spells. Returned to Nantucket where he died at the age of 40. Dr. John B. King (see Lot 72), one of his attending physicians, refused to submit a bill due to Myrick's poverty.
 


Lot 106  William Hadwen. April 26, 1791 - March 22, 1862.
William was the son of James Hadwen and Mary Peckham Hadwen. He married Eunice Starbuck, the daughter of merchant Joseph Starbuck on October 20, 1822. William came from Rhode Island to attend the wedding of his cousin
Nathaniel Barney to Eliza Starbuck. Here is where he first met his wife to be Eunice Starbuck.
William moved to Nantucket in 1820, and established himself as a silversmith. In 1829, He sold the business to his
apprentice James Easton (See Lot 130). William formed the firm of Hadwen & Barney with his cousin
and brother-in-law Nathaniel Barney as whale oil merchants and candle makers. First on Upper Main Street
then in the building that now houses The Whaling Museum. In 1845, William built the Greek Revival house
at 96 Main Street. He also built the house at 94 Main Street for his "adopted daughter", his niece
Mary Swain Wright. A house in which she never lived. William was listed in the 1852 issue of
Rich Men of Massachusetts as being worth $100,000 a little less than his father-in-law.

In 1860, during a dentist visit, William was given an overdose of ether. This accident would have been fatal had his doctor not arrived in time and saved William's life. However, the after effects of the ether caused William to suffer from partial paralysis of the heart, a condition he died from in 1862.  

You may view his photographic portraits in the Nantucket Historical Association collection.
Image Numbers P1237. P1238. P1239. Visit the Nantucket Historical Association's William Hadwen "popup" .

Click on the following links to view William Hadwen's obituary in the Nantucket Weekly Mirror, Saturday Morning, March 29, 1862.
Continued column Nantucket Weekly Mirror, Saturday Morning, March 29, 1862.

The Hadwen Lot as it appeared in 2007, included in Tuck't In: A Walking Tour of Historic Prospect Hill Cemetery Nantucket, MA and as the lot once looked when its gate and ironwork were intact, also included in Tuck't In, Image Number GPN4250 from the Nantucket Historical Association Historic Images Collection.
 


Lot 106  Eunice Starbuck Hadwen. December 29, 1799 - January 1, 1864.
Eunice was the daughter of Joseph Starbuck and Sally Gardner Starbuck. She first met her husband-to-be on May 18, 1820, at the wedding of her sister Eliza Starbuck to Nathaniel Barney. Eunice was twenty-three years old when she married William Hadwen on October 30, 1822. Eunice and William first lived at 100 Main Street, a house they shared with her sister and brother-in-law, Eliza and Nathaniel Barney. In 1844, William purchased the land at the corner of Pleasant and Main Streets and began construction of a Greek Revival house at 96 Main Street, across the street from the Three Bricks, the houses of  Eunice's brothers.

Eunice and William gave many lavish parties at 96 Main Street. The following is an account of two events given in their home in one day! The description was written in a letter dated December 23, 1847 from Susan Gardner (Clark) (See Lot 503) to her nephew William C. Gardner (See Lot 464)

"Last evening I was at the sewing circle at Mr. Hadwen's new house. We had a very pleasant time and they have a very beautiful house. There were one hundred persons there to tea and double that number in the evening, the later part of the evening we had an auction and
Mr. Barrett was auctineer and you know he is a good hand to make sport anytime..."


Eunice belonged to a weekly book club and was an amateur botanist. Her garden in the back of 96 Main Street, cared for by the Nantucket Garden Club since 1976, is open to the public. William bequeathed a life estate to Eunice with the property at 96 Main Street. The house would then go to their nephew Jospeh Starbuck Barney. Shortly after William's death, Eunice contracted diphtheria. She recovered from the disease but remained an invalid for the remainder of her life. In her will, Eunice left property worth about $60,000, comprised of stocks, bonds, furniture, horses, a house in 'Sconset, and land on Grove Lane, the remainder of her estate went to Jospeh Barney. Her obituary in the Nantucket Inquirer on January 6, 1864, praised her for her "great strength of character, singleness of purpose and great sense of duty."

Delia Hussey Coffin (lot 375), the daughter of Captain Peter Hussey and wife of Captain Edward Coffin reflected on her feelings of the new year and on the death of Eunice:

Friday, January 1, 1864
What has 1864 in store for the world. What will it add to our own life-history. Even this first day, has brought tears for the tomb, and one from our midst Mrs. Eunice Hadwen widow of Wm. Hadwen Esq. will watch the dawn of the next New Year's morning in Heaven. She died at three o'clock this afternoon, after an illness of 1 week of inflammation of the bowels. She survived her husband 12 months 9 days. She was 64 years old last Monday.


You may view Eunice Starbuck Hadwen's portrait in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number 1915.0023.001.

Click on the following links to view Eunice Starbuck Hadwen's obituary in the Nantucket Weekly Mirror, Saturday Morning, January 9, 1864.Continued column Nantucket Weekly Mirror, Saturday Morning, January 9, 1864.
 


Lot 106  George Francis Wright. October 28, 1848 - April 6, 1850.
                William Hadwen Wright. February 3, 1845 - July 28, 1845.
Children of George Wright and Mary B. Swain Wright. Their mother was known as the "adopted" daughter of
William and Eunice Starbuck Hadwen. Their parents moved to California where their father was the first Congressman
elected from this state.
 


Lot 106  Sarah Starbuck Gorham. December 25, 1797 - October 26, 1874.
Sarah was the daughter of Joseph Starbuck and Sally Gardner Starbuck. She was the second wife of Josiah Gorham. They married on
January 28, 1828.
 


Lot 106  Josiah Gorham. January 7, 1793 - February 28, 1871.
Josiah was the son of Jonathan Gorham and Mary Davis Gorham. His first wife was Kezia Peirce (seel Lot 81). He wed his second wife
Sarah Starbuck on January 28, 1828.
 


Lot 107  Captain Seth Pinkham. July 9, 1789 - April 17, 1844
Seth was the son of Jethro Pinkham and Susan Coffin Pinkham. He married Mary Brown on May 18, 1809. He was the father-in-law of Captain Henry R. Plaskett and Captain Joseph Marshall (see lot 161). The family had residences at 40 and 42 Fair Street and a house, Sans Souci, at 28 Broadway in 'Sconset. While master of the ship Henry Astor Captain Pinkham died at Pernambuco, "of diseases of the heart". His remains were placed on board a Baltimore brigg to return home to Nantucket.
Captain Pinkham was brought home to Nantucket and interred at Prospect Hill on June 6, 1844.

Inscribed on Captain Pinkham's marker:
                                                                   This grassy, convex mound
                                                                    But recently up-raised
                                                                   Speaks volumes from the ground
                                                                     To thinking men amazed
                                                                     
                                                                     And shall we check the fountain?
                                                                      And staunch the honest tear
                                                                    From weeping eyes, once held
                                                                       In memory so dear?

                                                                     Nay, do not supress them;
                                                                        In silence let them flow
                                                                     For him whose heart hath beat
                                                                        In unison with you!

Please visit our photo gallery to see Captain Seth Pinkham's marker.
 


Lot 107   Mary Pinkham. June 18, 1791 - April 14, 1874.
Mary was the daughter of  Captain William Brown and Elizabeth Coffin Brown. She was the wife of Captain Seth Pinkham.
You may view her portrait attributed to William Swain circa 1844 in the Nantucket Historical Association
collection. Image Number 1989.128.2.
 


Lot 107  William H. Crosby. November 18, 1813 - May 29, 1896.
William was the son of Captain Matthew Crosby and his first wife, Lydia Coffin Crosby. He married Elizabeth C. Pinkham, daughter of
Captain Seth Pinkham. William was a successful whaling merchant. Edouard A. Stackpole, in his book Rambling Through the Streets and Lanes of Nantucket, reports that William and his wife Elizabeth held many a delightful "social" in their home at 1 Pleasant Street. The first Chickering piano is said to have been in the east drawing room. They introduced frozen mousse to the island. The Great Fire of 1846 just about brought financial ruin for William when a number of warehouses burned where vast quantities of oil were stored.
It was a second loss by fire, the first occurring in 1838.


Lot 107  Elizabeth C. Crosby. February 2, 1816 - February 12, 1897.
Elizabeth was the daughter of Captain Seth Pinkham and Mary Brown Pinkham. She was born while her father was away at sea as master of the whaleship Dauphin. Elizabeth was the wife of Matthew Crosby, grandson of prosperous whale oil merchant Zenas Coffin.
 


Lot 107  Captain Henry R. Plaskett. December 12 1812 - November 7, 1893.
Henry was the son of Joseph Plaskett and Persis Colesworthy Plaskett. His two brothers were both whaling masters. Captain William Plaskett (see Lot 268) and Captain Joseph Plaskett, who died of yellow fever in Bonavista, Newfoundland, in 1846.
Captain Plaskett was the husband of Mary B. Pinkham, daughter of Captain Seth Pinkham (see Lot 107). He is the brother-in-law of
Captain Joseph Marshall. You may view his "cased" photograph circa 1860's in the
Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number C141.

Please visit our photo gallery to see Captain Henry R. Plaskett's marker.
 


Lot 109  Mary Eliza Macy. April 20, 1845 - April 21, 1931.
Mary Eliza was the daughter of Philip Macy and Susan Wilson Macy. Her residence was 99 Main Street. You may view her photographic
portraits c. 1840's Image Number P9954 and c. 1920's in her garden Image Number P9956.

Click on the link to view Mary Eliza Macy's obituary in The Inquirer and Mirror, Saturday, August 29, 1931.
Click on the link to view "The Old Order Changeth." by Walter Gilman Page (lot 742) The Inquirer and Mirror, Saturday, August 29, 1931.
 


Lot 110  Obed Macy. January 15, 1762 - December 24, 1844.
Obed was the son of Caleb Macy and Judith Folger Macy. He married Abigail Pinkham in 1786.
He was a Quaker, whaling master, ship owner, businessman, farmer, blacksmith, author, local historian and
Clerk of the Proprietors of the Common and Undivided Land. He went into partnership with his brother, Silvanus to manufacture soap and spermaceti candles. They also acted as agents for various ships. In 1835 he published History of Nantucket

Click on the following link to view an advertisment for Obed Macy's History of Nantucket in the Nantucket Inquirer, May 2, 1835.
 


Lot 111  Ann Eliza Macy. January 27, 1818 - April 26, 1882.
Ann Eliza was the daughter of Josiah Macy and Lydia Hussey Macy. She married Isaac Macy, the son of Thomas Macy and grandson of Obed Macy on November 6, 1839. You may view her portrait attributed to Thomas Hicks c. 1839 in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number 1989.141.2.
 


Lot 113  Charles T. Westgate. January 9, 1843 - February 5, 1875
Charles was the son of James Westgate and his first wife, Lydia Davis Westgate. In 1859, he was a crew member aboard the ship Hesper sailing out of New Bedford. Charles was thirty-two-years old  when he died at Wakefield, Massachusetts from "congestion of lungs".


Lot 114  Captain Timothy Fitzgerald. March 8, 1789 - September 14, 1852.
Timothy was the son of Henry Fitzgerald and Lydia Wyer Fitzgerald. He was the brother of Captain Nathaniel Fitzgerald (see Lot 139).
He was the husband of Lydia Whippey Fitzgerald. Captain Fitzgerald was master of ships Francis and Ocean.


Lot 114  Lydia Fitzgerald. November 12, 1791 - June 14, 1871.
Lydia was the daughter of David Whippey and Kezia Bunker Whippey. She was the wife of Captain Timothy Fitzgerald. At the time of her death, Lydia was living in New Bedford, MA, with her sister Kezia Whippey Smith, brother-in-law Shubael Smith and a nurse,
Mary McCormick.


Lot 115  Captain Eben Hinckley. June 19, 1805 - August 22, 1885.
Eben was the son of Elishai Hinckley and Lucinda Swain Hinckley. He married Nancy Chase on August 19, 1833.
Captain Hinckley was master of the ship "Martha" that sailed to San Francisco in 1849 during the "California fever". At the time of his death on Nantucket, Captain Hinckley was a farmer.


Lot 115  Nancy M. Hinckley. June 1, 1810 - January 25, 1892.
Nancy was the daughter of James F. Chase and Eliza Folger Chase. Married Eben Hinckley.
She was the wife of Captain Eben M. Hinckley.


Lot 116  Henry Coffin. March 17, 1807 - March 6, 1900.
Henry was the son of Zenas Coffin and Abial Gardner Coffin. He married Elisa Starbuck, daughter of Levi Starbuck in 1833.
He owned a whale ship firm with his brother Charles Coffin. Herman Melville was a crew member during
the 1840-1845 voyage of the "Charles and Henry" owned by Charles G. Coffin and Henry Coffin. Mr. Melville
wrote about this experience in his autobiographical novel "Omoo". Henry built his home at 75 Main Street,
hiring Christopher Capon whom he paid $503.63 for his masonry work. Christopher Capon also worked
as mason for both Henry's brother Charles' house and Joseph Starbuck's "The Three Bricks".

Click on the following link to view Henry Coffin's obituary from The Inquirer and Mirror, March 10, 1900.
 


Lot 116  Eliza Coffin. February 10, 1811 - February 26, 1903.
Eliza was the daughter of Levi Starbuck  and Elizabeth Ramsdell Starbuck. She was the niece of Joseph Starbuck (See Lot 90) and
Captain Simeon Starbuck (See Lot 142). She was the sister of Captain Obed Starbuck (See Lot 136).
Eliza wed Henry Coffin on November 14,1833.


Lot 116  Charles F. Coffin. April 8, 1835 - April 10, 1919.
Charles was the son of Henry Coffin and Eliza Starbuck Coffin. He was the grandson of Zenas Coffin and Abial Gardner Coffin on his father's side, and the grandson of Levi Starbuck and Elizabeth Ramsdell Starbuck on his mother's side. Charles married Eliza P. Gardner, the daughter of Captain John J. Gardner on February 2, 1858. In 1860, He recorded his occupation as goods dealer and in 1900, as merchant in the U.S. Federal Census. You may view Charles in a group photograph in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number P1857.


Lot 116  Eliza P. Coffin. 1837 - March 13, 1916.
Eliza was the daughter of Captain John J. Gardner and Eliza Worth Gardner. She wed Charles F. Coffin on February 2, 1858.
You may view her in a group portrait in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number P1857.


Lot 118 Hon. Barker Burnell. January 30, 1798 - June 15, 1843.
Barker was the son of Jonathan Burnell and Polly Giles Burnell. He married Judith Barney on November 15, 1818. Barker was a member of the 27th Congress of the United States. He was a Whig; A member of MA State House of Representatives 1819;
A delegate to MA State Constitutional Convention in 1820; A member of MA State Senate 1824-1825;
A delegate to Whig National Convention from MA;  A U.S. Representative from MA 1841-1843.

On Thursday December 14, 1843 in the House of Representatives John Quincy Adams announced the death
of their colleague Barker Burnell this past June 15, 1843. He then made the following motions: Expressions of
sympathy to the surviving widow and relatives; the wearing of crape on the left arm for thirty days and out of
respect for his memory to adjourn until noon the following day. These motions past and the they adjourned.

The Honorable Barker Burnell died of consumption at the boarding house of Mrs. McDaniels in "Washington City", while in office. His interment and cenotaph was at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.;  His re-interment in 1844 was at
Prospect Hill Cemetery, Nantucket, MA. Inscribed on his marker: "Member of the 27th & 28th Congress of The
United States Died at Washington City June 15, 1843 Aged 45 years.

Click on the following link to read his obituary Death of the Hon. Barker Burnell, M.C. of Massachusetts in the Saturday, June 17, 1843 The National Intelligencer from the Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress. On-line. Internet. Available http://www.congressionalcemetery.org/sites/default/files/Obits_Burnell.pdf

Click on the following link to view Hon. Barker Burnell's page at Historic Congressional Cemetery http://www.congressionalcemetery.org/obituary-burnell-barker  

Click on the following link to read Hon. Barker Burnell's obituary in the Nantucket Inquirer, June 24, 1843.

Click on the following link to read the Nantucket Inquirer, Wednesday, June 28, 1843 article:
The Funeral Of The Hon. Barker Burnell.

Please visit our photo gallery to see Barker Burnell's marker.


Lot 118  Judith Barney Burnell. January 27, 1798 - October 14, 1884.
Judith was the daughter of Jonathan J. Barney and Mary (Polly) Folger Barney. She was the wife of Barker Burnell.
You may view her portrait attributed to William Swain circa 1840's in the Nantucket Historical Association
collection. Image Number 1992.540.1.

On January 26, 1874, Judith attended a reception by the Nantucket Sorosis Society hosted by Joseph Barney at his 96 Main Street residence now known as the Hadwen House. The Inquirer and Mirror covered the event. A letter by Mrs. Rebecca. A. Morse of the New York Sorosis Society was read and it included her recollection of Judith Barney Burnell:

...And Mrs. J. Burnell a favorite with all, upon whom long years have set their crown of rejoicing, is yet a lady of fine ability, who in earlier time, graced the literary circles of Washington...

Click on the following link to read In Memoriam for Judith Burnell in The Nantucket Journal, October 16, 1884.


Lot 119  Sydney Chase. December 3, 1846 - March 21, 1932.
Sydney was the son of Captain Frederick Chase and Mary Ann Myrick Chase. He married Ella Merihew.
Sydney was president of the Boston Stock Exchange. He resided on Beacon Street in Boston and summered on the island at 82 Main Street.


Lot 122 Captain Reuben Baxter. March 24, 1773 - September 30, 1861.
Reuben was the son of Christopher Baxter and Mary Worth Baxter. He married Love Briggs in 1796.
Reuben was the father of master mariners Captain David C. Baxter (See Lot 178) and Captain William Baxter.
In 1801, Reuben purchased 23 India Street now known as the "Captain Reuben Baxter House". from 'housewrights'
John and Perez Jenkins for $1,600.00. He was the first of four Captains to reside in this house. The others were Captain Alexander Bunker (See Lot 439), Captain Alexander Russell and Captain Samuel C. Wyer (See Lot 198).

Captain Baxter died on Nantucket at the age of eighty-eight. Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910 recorded his cause of death as old age.


Lot 122  Love Baxter. December 13, 1771 - June 30, 1864.
Love was the daughter of Abner Briggs and his first wife Deborah Coffin Briggs. She married Reuben Baxter in 1796 and they had four children. William (b. 1805), Eliza (b. 1808), Mary (b. 1811), and David (b. 1814) Captain William Baxter and Captain David Baxter (lot 178) followed their father to the sea.


Lot 122  Love Bucknam. June 18, 1835 - April 13, 1917.
Love was the only child of Captain William Baxter and Betsey Carey Baxter. Love was forty years old when she wed fifty-year-old Albion K. P. Bucknam on February 26, 1876. Love was Albion's second wife. The couple did not have children.

Love, along with her father, ran the unoffical post office in Sconset from their cottage. According to
The Library of Congress' Historic American Buildings Survey "Captain Baxter would come over the hill in
his stage, blow many blasts on his horn to inform the residents that the mail was arriving." He and Love
would sort and hand out the mail, charging one cent for each piece.  In 1872, the post office was formally
recognized by the United States. Love was appointed as postmistress at a salary of $12.00 a year.
Her father was paid $8.00 annually to carry the mail to the boat. Their cottage now known as "Shanunga"
a.k.a. "Betsey Carey Cottage" was used as the post office until 1883.


Lot 123  Captain Reuben R. Bunker. July 6, 1775 - November 29, 1855.
Reuben was the son of Tristram Bunker and Abigail Ramsdell Bunker. He married Rachel Chase in 1799.
In 1806 Captain Bunker purchasd land from Latham Gardner and the heirs of the Estate of Caleb Macy.
He erected a house now known as "Reuben R. Bunker House". It is located 'Academy Hill the last house on the south side of Church Avenue.

Please visit our photo gallery to see Captain Reuben R. Bunker's marker.
 


Lot 123  Charles Bunker, Esq. August 8, 1802 - August 22, 1881.
Charles was the son of Captain Reuben R. Bunker and Rachel Chase Bunker. He married Judith Folger on February 15, 1826. A lawyer, Charles edited the 'Inquirer' and held several civil offices.


Lot 123  Sarah Bunker. June 27, 1830 - May 8, 1890.
Sarah was the daughter of Charles Bunker and Judith Folger Bunker and granddaughter of Captain Reuben R. Bunker.
In 1859, Sarah's father deeded the house now known as the "Reuben R. Bunker House" to her.


Lot 124  Captain Paul West. January 1, 1778 - March 3, 1862.
Paul was the son of Charles West and Hepsabeth Paddack West. His first wife Phebe Hussey, the daughter of Captain Benjamin Hussey. Captain West's second wife was Lucy Coffin Swain, the widow of Robert Swain and the daughter of William Coffin (see Lot 12 South Side).
You may view his photographic portrait c. 1840's in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number C188.


Lot 124  Phebe West. January 3, 1783 - December 25, 1846.
Phebe was the daughter of Captain Benjamin Hussey and Phebe Macy Hussey. She was the first wife of Captain Paul West.


Lot 124  Lucy West. January 23, 1785 - April 10, 1871.
Daughter of William Coffin and Deborah Pinkham Coffin (Lot 12 South Side). Her first husband was Robert Swain and he second husband
 was Captain Paul West.


Lot 125  Captain Henry I. Defriez. May 19, 1791 - November 18, 1871.
Henry was born in England and came to Nantucket in 1819. 
His irst wife was Elizabeth "Betsey" Coffin and his second wife was Anna Barnard. Captain Defriez was
the father of Captain Thaddeus Defriez (see Lot 627). He was a whaling master, merchant and ship owner.

Please visit our photo gallery to see Captain Henry I. Defriez's marker.


Lot 125  Elizabeth "Betsey" Defriez. September 20, 1798 - April 27, 1829.
Elizabeth was the daughter of Thaddeus Coffin and Ann Parker Coffin. She was the first wife of Captain Henry Defriez.


Lot 125  Ferdinand White Defriez. October 31, 1835 - September 22, 1863.
Ferdinand was the son of Captain Henry Defriez and his second wife Anna Barnard Defrieze. He was Acting Ensign U.S. Navy.
when he died at Pensacola, FL of yellow fever.

Inscribed on Ferdinand White Defriez's marker:
                                                                                    ERECTED
                                                                                to the memory of
                                                                              FERDINAND WHITE
                                                                                       son of
                                                                                Henry I & Anna B.
                                                                                     DEFRIEZ
                                                                           Acting Ensign U.S. Ship
                                                                         Vincennes died at Pensacola
                                                                                Fla. of yellow fever.
                                                                                  Sept. 22, 1863
                                                                                        AE. 28
                                                                           Decorum est pro patria mori

                                                                                       
To view Ferdinand White Defriez's marker please visit our photo gallery. You may also see the marker's image and learn more about Ferdinand in the Prospect Hill Cemetery Association's book: Tuck't In: A Walking Tour of Historic Prospect Hill Cemetery Nantucket, MA.
Click on the link to view Ferdinand Defriez's death notice from the Nantucket Weekly Mirror, Saturday, October 31, 1863.


Lot 125  Henry Coffin Defriez, Jr. May 3, 1820 - April 11, 1846.
Henry, Jr. was the son of Captain Henry Defriez and his first wife Elizabeth "Betsey" Coffin Defriez.


Lot 126  Captain Elisha H. Fisher. March 5, 1807 - December 4, 1883.
Elisha was the son of Freeborn Fisher and Polly Nichols Fisher. He married Louisa Drew. You may view his photograph c. 1850's
in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number C86.


Lot 126  Louisa Drew Fisher. March 2, 1810 - January 16, 1891.
Louisa was the daughter of Gershom Drew and Abigail Gardner Drew. She was the wife of Captain Elisha H. Fisher.


Lot 126  Emma L. Fisher. 1854 - February 22, 1920.
Emma was the daughter of Captain Elisha H. Fisher and Louisa Drew Fisher.


Lot 126A  Captain Charles A. Gardner. November 7, 1813 - July 23, 1880.
Charles was the son of Hezekiah Gardner and Rebecca Barrett Gardner. He was the first husband of Mary Hussey Gardner Vincent.


Lot 126A  Mary W. Hussey Gardner Vincent. December 20, 1815 - November 4, 1907
Mary was the daughter of Francis Hussey and Peggy Chadwick Hussey. Her first husband was Captain Charles A. Gardner.
She married her second husband Daniel Vincent in 1883. You may view her portrait circa 1840 by
James S. Hathaway in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number 1920.38.1.


Lot 128  Captain Benjamin Franklin Riddell. February 23,1804 - August 22, 1862.
Benjamin was the son of Henry Riddell and Hepsabeth Wyer Coleman Riddell. The Reverend Seth Swift married Benjamin and Lydia Coffin on June 20, 1831.

Captain Riddell was master of the ships Franklin on the October 12, 1837 to February 13, 1841 voyage and the
Harvest on the August 9, 1853 to November 10, 1857 voyage. You may view his portrait attributed to
William Swain in the Nantucket Historical Association collection. Image Number 1927.4.1 . Captain Riddell died of yellow fever  in
Montego Bay, Jamacia at the age of fifty-eight.


Lot 128  Judge Henry Riddell. May 18, 1848 - April 25, 1929.
Henry was the son of Captain Benjamin Franklin Riddell and Lydia Coffin Riddell. He married Alice Macy on September 3, 1882.
He was the nephew of Captain Timothy W. Riddell. Henry was a Judge of the Probate Court.
You may view his photographic portraits in the Nantucket Historical Association collection.
Image Numbers P732, P733, P861.

Please visit our photo gallery to see Judge Henry Riddell's marker.

Click on the highlighted link to view Judge Henry Riddell's obituary from The Inquirer and Mirror, Saturday, April 27, 1929.


Lot 128  Alice Cameron Riddell. September 23, 1861 - May 25, 1928.
Alice was the daughter of Charles H. Macy and Emeline Addinton Macy. She married Henry Riddell on September 23, 1881.
Alice resided at 20 Centre Street.
You may view her photographic portrait in the Nantuket Historical Association collection. Image Number P730.


Lot 130  Captain Christopher Wyer. October 20, 1777 - June 26, 1850.
Christopher was the son of Captain Robert Wyer and Zilpha Sherman Wyer. In 1807, he married Priscilla Coleman. Captain Wyer was master of the ships Ruby and Lima. He was the Owner/Agent of ships Narraganset, Henry Clay and Edward Cary.
He resided at 33 Orange Street. Now known as the "Robert Wyer House". Captain Christopher Wyer purchased the house and land from his father Robert for $400.00 in 1814. 


Lot 130  Honorable James Easton, 2nd. February 20, 1807 - February 20, 1903.
James married Sarah Wyer the daughter of Captain Christopher Wyer. He came from Providence, Rhode Island to
apprentice with William Hadwen as silversmith, watch and jewelry maker.His silver is marked with "J. Easton",
"J. Easton 2nd", or "Easton & Sanford". In 1853, James was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention of Massachusetts. After the Civil War, he was a State Senator for two years. James was also a member of the School Committee.
At the time of his death at the age of 96, he was the oldest resident of Nantucket.

Click on the following link to view page 1 of James Easton's obituary in The Inquirer and Mirror, February 21, 1903.
Click on the following link to view page 2 of James Easton's obituary in The Inquirer and Mirror, February 21, 1903.
Click on the following link to view the memoriam by Arthur Elwell Jenks (Lot 602) for James Easton in
The Inquirer and Mirror, February 28, 1903. "In Memory" .


Lot 136  Captain Obed Starbuck. May 11, 1797 - June 27, 1882.
Obed was the son of Levi Starbuck and Elizabeth Ramsdell Starbuck. His first wife was Eunice Paddack.
He married his second wife, Martha S. Wright Crocker Hussey of West Barnstable, MA in 1873. He was the nephew of
Joseph Starbuck (See Lot 90) and Captain Simeon Starbuck (See Lot 142). Obed was the brother of
Eliza Starbuck Coffin (See Lot 116).

In 1819, Obed was a mate aboard the ship Hero. It was during this